Thursday, November 18, 2010

Few things to know about your eyes

We know very few people who are satisfied with condition of skin around their eye area. As we get older, fine lines, crow’s feet, dark circles and eye bags become more prominent. Indeed we would like to get rid of all those, and quick. But is it possible? Let’s first take a look at the various factors causing the problems that plague our eye area.

1. Thinner skin

The skin around our eyes is said to be seven to ten times thinner and more delicate than the skin on the rest of our face. This is why it is always said that our eye area is more sensitive and we should treat it delicately and not rub our eyes as that action can contribute to wrinkles. Maybe the worst fact is that as we age, the skin around our eyes get even thinner due to a loss of collagen and elastin.

2. Hereditary factor

Hence, because the skin under you eye becomes thinner over time, dark circles become more apparent due to the dense capillary network beneath and when the blood that passes through the large veins close to the surface of the skin produce a bluish tint. So if you’ve inherited a thinner and more transparent skin, chances are, your dark circles can be very apparent.

3. Leaky capillaries

And as these are not enough, with age or illness, the tiny capillaries in our skin can get weakened and thus leaky. The fluid from these leaky capillaries along with the hemoglobin slowly accumulates below the eyes, thereby forming the look of dark circles. Hemoglobin is the main ingredient in red blood cells and contains a heme group whose iron atoms bind to oxygen molecules. When oxygen molecules are detached and hemoglobin becomes oxidized, red blood cells turn bluish in color. That is what happens with dark eye circles.

4. Sebaceous glands

The skin around our eye area is highly prone to dryness because it has few sebaceous glands unlike skin around other parts of our face. So on a whole, it has a poor lipid barrier, and more prone to lines forming.

5. Skeletal framework

If you have prominent cheekbones and a pair of deep-set eyes, chances are, you’ll get these deep hollow contours below the eyes. As such, it would seem like your dark circles are very pronounced although it could be an illusion caused by the shadow.

6. Toxins in your organs

Dark skin under the eyes may mean sleep problems or toxins in the kidney and or the liver. Accordng to TCM, the top of the eye and directly below the eyes is the kidney zone. Puffiness and fluid retention in this area is a sign the body is holding on to too much fluid (watery and swollen with a blue tinge) or is mucus congested (fatty and swollen with a yellow tinge). Blue circles or white under the eyes indicates tiredness or even exhaustion. A yellow tinge shows the liver and gallbladder are working too hard.

If your gall bladder is not functioning well enough to process and break down fats in your body, this may contribute to milia (milia seeds) around the eye area for some people.

7. Frequent eye movements

The skin around the eyes is affected by the number of times you blink, and your facial expressions. Often called expression lines, these unfortunately calls attention to your eye area for the wrong reason.

8. Shape of eyebrows

Don’t underestimate your eyebrows as the shape of your brow can make your eyes look larger and brighter. So a better arched eyebrow can make you look more awake and enhance your overall appearance.

So if you’re troubled by your eye area like most of us, the best help you can get is get enough rest and sleep, drink plenty of water, reduce consumption of salt and foods rich in sodium and... don't squint too much..

To compliment all your efforts we can suggest using newest on the market I*Light Organic Advanced Brightening & Line Smoothing Eye Treatment, designed to help you achieve the best eyes ever. It offers quadruple action. Unique blend of natural oils and plant extracts instantly smooth out fine lines and wrinkles, de-congests and lightens the eye area, instantly minimizing visible under eye shadowing and puffiness. After 4 weeks it visibly reduces fine lines and wrinkles, dark circles and puffiness. More information.

NEW! Introducing Lumi*Essence Organic Advanced Brightening Repair Treatment with Kojic Acid, Arbutin & Vitamin C

Lumi*Essence Treatment is an Anti-Dark Spot Concentrate recommended for:

* Dark spots / Sun spots / Age spots
* Uneven skin, Melazma
* Skin discolorations

Lumi*Essence visibly corrects dark spots and helps even skin tone with a breakthrough formula that delivers professional-grade results. Contains Kojic Acid (helps lighten and reduce the appearance of dark spots), Alpha-Arbutin (derived from the leaves of cranberry, blueberry and bearberry shrubs. Skin lightening agent that prevents conversion of pigment-forming enzymes) Papaya and Pineapple extract (provides intense exfoliation to help reduce the size and color intensity of dark spots and help even skin tone). Niacinamide has an inhibitory effect on the transfer of melanosomes to skin cells, thus it can interrupt the process that causes irregular pigmentation to form. Milk thistle (sometimes called Silymarine) There are many studies that show it to be effective as an anti-oxidant, an anti-inflammatory, and for UV protection and repair. It has also been shown to reduce the spread of skin cancer.


* The appearance of dark spots and discoloration is visibly diminished
* Skin radiance is increased
* Skin complexion is more uniform
* Lightweight, fast absorbing essence leaves skin fresh
* Artificial Fragrance free
* Non comedogenic
* Hydroquinone-free
* Safe for sensitive skin

Ingredients: Purified Water, Organic Barbadensis Leaf Juice (Aloe), Organic Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower Oil), Glyceryl Stearate, Kosher Vegetable Glycerin, Octyl Palmitate, Organic Cocos Nucifera (Coconut Oil), Theobroma Cacao (Cocoa Butter), Cetyl Alcohol, Potassium Stearate, Organic Beeswax, Organic Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba Oil), Hyaluronic Acid, Alpha-Arbutin, Organic Centella Asiatica (Kojic Acid), Rosa Damascena (Rose) Essential Oil, Calophyllum Tacamahaca (Tamanu Oil), Organic Borago Officinalis (Borage Oil), Organic Linum Usitatissimum (Flax Seed Oil), Organic Oenothera Biennis (Evening Primrose Oil), Organic Rosa Canina (Rose Hip Oil), Panthenol (Vitamin B5), Organic Lycium Barbarium (Goji Berry) Fruit Extract, CoQ10, Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate (Vitamin C), Organic Ganoderma Lucidum (Reishi), Caviar Extract, Organic Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea), Punica Granatum (Pomegranate), Silk Protein Amino Acid Blend (Sodium L-Pyrrolidone Carboxylate, Sodium Lactate, L-Arginine, L-Aspartic Acid, L-Pyrrolidonecarboxylic Acid, Glycine, L-Alanine, L-Serine, L-Valine, L-Proline, L-threonine, L-Isoleucine, L-Histidine, L-Phenylalanine), Organic Silybum Marianum (Milk Thistle), Rubus Idaeus (Raspberry) Seed Oil, Organic Vaccinium Macrocarpon (Cranberry), Organic Myrica Cerifera (Bayberry), Santalum Album (Sandalwood) Essential Oil, Helichrysum Italicum (Helichrysum Essential Oil), Hippophae Rhamnoides (Seabuckthorn Oil), Carica Papaya (Papaya), Ananas Sativus (Pineapple) Fruit Extract, Niacinamide, Pearl Powder, Citrus Limon (Lemon Essential Oil), Organic Aspalathus linearis (Rooibos Tea) Extract, Silica, Allantoin, Organic Arnica Montana (Arnica), Organic Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender), Organic Calendula Officinalis (Calendula), Organic Anthemis Nobilis (Chamomile), Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Oil, Macadamia Integrifolia (Macadamia Nut Oil), Sodium Carbomer, Phenoxyethanol, Ethyl Hexyl Glycerin.

Buy it here.

The great-skin diet

All sorts of supplements, special eating plans and complexion drinks promise glowing skin from the inside out. But not everything that is being dished out is based on science. We digested the research and polled experts to determine which foods to add to your diet to truly benefit skin, which may be worth an occasional munch and which to pass up. Get ready to eat, drink and be beautiful!

Proven complexion perfecters

Pile these on your plate. All pack nutrients essential for healthy skin.

Strawberries, citrus fruits, red peppers, broccoli

Beauty benefit: a smooth texture

Eat-right evidence: Vitamin C, plentiful in this produce, is vital for the production and formation of collagen, skin's support structure, says Toby Amidor, R.D., director of nutrition for in New York City. And a strong support layer helps smooth what's on top and prevent wrinkles, she says. Aim for: two 1-cup servings of fruit and 1 cup of red peppers and/or broccoli a day

Sunflower seeds and almonds

Beauty benefit: sun protection

Eat-right evidence: These seeds and nuts are loaded with vitamin E. Collectively, antioxidants act like an army, protecting skin from UV-spawned free radicals. But E is on the front lines; skin's top layers contain high levels that guard cells' outer membrane so cells stay healthy. Plus, strong membranes hold water in, keeping skin hydrated. Aim for: 2 tablespoons hulled seeds or 23 almonds daily

Dark orange, leafy green and red veggies

Beauty benefit: a fresh complexion

Eat-right evidence: Squash, sweet potatoes and spinach are full of the antioxidant beta-carotene. Your body converts it to vitamin A, which regulates cell production and turnover so skin's surface is smooth, says Valori Treloar, M.D., coauthor of The Clear Skin Diet (Cumberland House Publishing). Carotenoids may also decrease skin's sensitivity to sun. Aim for: three 1-cup servings a day

Fortified cereal, lean meat, pork, poultry, oysters

Beauty benefit: a youthful glow

Eat-right evidence: You'll get zinc and iron, minerals key to skin functioning. Zinc contributes to cell production, plus natural cell sloughing, which keeps dullness at bay. Red blood cells need iron to carry oxygen to skin, helping give you a glow, says David Bank, M.D., a derm in Mount Kisco, New York. Aim for: 1 serving of cereal (a cup), 1 palm-sized serving of meat or poultry or 3 oysters per day


Beauty benefit: dewy skin

Eat-right evidence: Skin cells contain mostly water, and if you're dehydrated, skin will look and feel parched, too. But you needn't chug 8 cups a day; University of Pennsylvania researchers found no studies to back up the recommendation. Simply ward off dehydration—and dryness—by drinking when you're thirsty. Aim for: 6 cups a day. It's a good starting point, says Keri Gans, R.D., of NYC.

Smart skin suggestions

New research hints at these foods' beauty power, but effects aren't totally proven yet. No need to wait, though; the goodies are part of a healthy diet.

Wild salmon, Atlantic mackerel, walnuts

Beauty benefit: fewer wrinkles

Eat-right evidence: These fish and nuts, plus fortified eggs, are bursting with omega-3 fatty acids, which fight inflammation in the body caused by sun and stress. "Inflammation produces free radicals, and free radicals contribute to aging by attacking collagen," says Susan Taylor, M.D., a dermatologist in Philadelphia. But research still needs to connect the dots definitively and show that the anti-inflammatory abilities of omega-3s translate to younger-looking skin, she says. One study did find that older people who consumed more fish and veggies over their life had fewer wrinkles than those who ate more meat, the Journal of the American College of Nutrition reports. The research didn't focus solely on fish, however; vegetables' antioxidants, for example, may have been a factor. Aim for: two 5-ounce servings of fish per week; on other days, 1 oz of walnuts or 2 omega-3 eggs

Whole wheat and grains

Beauty benefit: clearer skin

Eat-right evidence: In the past, derms have maintained that unless you wipe greasy fingers on your face, food doesn't cause zits. But some are rethinking the party line: Australian researchers found that a low-glycemic diet (more whole grains, protein and produce versus refined carbs such as white bread) may reduce acne. One explanation: Low-glycemic foods keep insulin steady, and refined carbs and sugar spike it. The surges may boost production of androgens, hormones that, when elevated, can cause zits. After 12 weeks of a low-glycemic diet, subjects' pimple counts dropped 20 percent, a study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition notes. More studies are needed to prove the link, but no doctor will discourage you from eating whole grains and veggies! Aim for: 3 servings a day (one serving equals a slice of bread or 1/2 cup cooked grains)

Today's special: gorgeous skin If your complexion could choose everything you ate for the day, here's what would be on the menu, says Keri Gans, R.D., who put together this plan.


  • 1 cup whole-grain, fortified cereal such as Total
  • 1 cup skim milk
  • 1 cup sliced strawberries or 1 medium grapefruit
  • 1 cup green tea


  • Grilled chicken sandwich
  • 5 oz chicken breast
  • 2 slices whole-grain bread
  • 2 slices tomato
  • 1 leaf lettuce
  • 1/8 of avocado
  • 1 tsp mustard
  • 1 medium apple


  • 5 oz wild salmon
  • Spinach salad
  • 2 cups fresh spinach
  • 1/2 cup sliced red bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup chopped tomato
  • 1/2 cup broccoli
  • Toss with 1 tbsp each olive oil and balsamic vinegar
  • 1 medium baked sweet potato


  • 8 oz nonfat plain yogurt or 1 part-skim string cheese
  • 1 oz sunflower seeds
  • 1 small orange or 1 cup baby carrots
  • 1 oz dark chocolate or 1 glass red wine

Beauty treat or trouble?

Guess if the following foods are good or bad for your skin—and find out the reasons why.


Trouble Chowing candy and other sugary snacks may make you feel like a kid, but it's likely aging you. The rush of glucose into your bloodstream sets off a process known as glycation, in which sugars attach to proteins and form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). These molecules naturally build up in skin as you get older, but the more sugar you eat, the more AGEs you have. Bad news: They cross-link with collagen and elastin fibers, making the normally resilient tissues weak or inflexible, Dr. Bank says. And skin that doesn't bounce back easily leads to wrinkles and sagging. In fact, the study showing fish lovers had fewer wrinkles revealed the opposite for those with a sweet tooth.

Dark chocolate

Treat Although there might be some truth to the claims that sugar-laden chocolate contributes to acne (and wrinkles), the high-quality, dark variety—70 percent or more cocoa—may actually be good for your skin. Preliminary studies found that cocoa's flavonols (a potent type of antioxidant) can help increase blood flow, supply skin with oxygen, improve skin hydration and reduce sun sensitivity. But dark chocolate is high in calories, so treat yourself to only 1 oz a day.


Trouble Got acne? Milk may not be doing your skin good. Three new studies have found a connection between teens' milk intake and pimples. This could potentially translate to adults; however, it's not been proven. More research is under way, but the probable explanation is hormone-related. Androgens naturally found in milk (even organic versions without added hormones) may add to a drinker's own level of androgens, which are associated with oily skin and acne. Milk also raises insulin levels and contains growth factors that act like insulin, Dr. Treloar says. Both may lower the production of molecules that bind to and deactivate hormones—meaning there may be more free-roaming androgens able to cause pimples. It's too early to prescribe a dairy ban for anyone zit-plagued. But it may be worth experimenting with a milk-free diet if you have excessive, stubborn breakouts, Dr. Treloar says. (Be sure, however, to take a calcium supplement with vitamin D.)

Spicy foods

Trouble Rosacea sufferers know to avoid five-alarm meals. But if you have fair, sun-damaged skin, hot-and-spicy foods may lead to the condition or to a red, blotchy complexion. "UV exposure weakens blood vessel walls. If your skin then repeatedly flushes, which swells vessels, they may not be able to shrink back down," Dr. Treloar says.


Treat Reds are rich in polyphenols, antioxidants that help fight skin-damaging free radicals. But sip no more than one glass a day, says Katherine Brooking, R.D., of NYC. Excessive alcohol halts your body's release of its antidiuretic hormone. As a result, you make extra visits to the ladies' room and end up not only feeling dehydrated, but having skin that looks dry, with a dull tone and more visible wrinkles. So enjoy wine in moderation—and make a toast to great skin! Cheers!...